According to the script, Guinan was supposed to start telling Lal, ‘When a man and a woman are in love …’ and in the background, there would be men and women sitting at tables, holding hands[…] But Whoopi refused to say that. She said, ‘This show is beyond that. It should be ‘When two people are in love.’ — TNG research assistant Richard Arnold on TNG 3x16, The Offspring [x] (via macpye)

Star Trek speaks to some basic human needs, that there is a tomorrow - it’s not all going to be over with a big flash and a bomb. This is the human adventure. It’s just begun.

To the audience, you’re playing out this metaphor of a taboo that you’re not supposed to be involved with somebody, and the audience sees these two women who are in love together, but the show will never ever comment on it, because it’s really about this Trill taboo, this completely other issue. But the idea of homosexual love is staring the audience in the face no matter what they do, but we never have to mention it in the show. It just became this lovely tale about these two forbidden lovers that just couldn’t get over that one had died and didn’t get a chance to say goodbye, and here they come together in these two other bodies, but what they once felt for one another is still there, but the societal taboo was so strong that one of them had to back out, one of them wasn’t willing to take it all the way. It was just a lovely bit of Star Trek because it really was an allegory for our society, and that’s ultimately what Trek does best. — Ronald D. Moore, Writer & Producer, on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine S4E05: Rejoined (via inamirrordorkly)
Some people view Gene as a man with a wild futuristic utopian fantasy, but that’s too simple. Star Trek did not promise that people would magically become inherently “better,” but that they would progress, always reaching for their highest potential and noblest goals, even if it took centuries of taking two steps forward and one step back. Ideally, humankind would be guided in its quest by reason and justice. The ultimate futility of armed conflict, terrorism, dictatorial rule, prejudice, disregard for the environment, and exercising power for its own sake was demonstrated time and time again. Even our most humorous episode, “The Trouble with Tribbles,” illustrated the risks of removing a species from its natural habitat. — Nichelle Nichols, “Beyond Uhura” (via caitlincaitland)

tennantarse:

Typical Star Trek Quotes isnpired by x

(Quotes that highlight the theme of the series)

for carmelilla9

(via teroknortailor)


"We liked the idea of showing the domestic life. In the midst of all the pressure that Sisko is under, he still has issues at home. He’s still a human being. Kasidy burns his peppers. That hurts! Life is hard, but you should not have to have your peppers burned!"
- Ira Behr, executive producer & writerStar Trek Deep Space Nine Companion

"We liked the idea of showing the domestic life. In the midst of all the pressure that Sisko is under, he still has issues at home. He’s still a human being. Kasidy burns his peppers. That hurts! Life is hard, but you should not have to have your peppers burned!"

- Ira Behr, executive producer & writer
Star Trek Deep Space Nine Companion

(via teroknortailor)

That came up at the very first press conference [for Star Trek: The Next Generation]; a reporter asked Gene Roddenberry “…It doesn’t make any sense! You’ve got a bald actor playing this part! Surely by the 24th century they would have found a cure for male pattern baldness!” And Gene Roddenberry said, “No, by the 24th century no one will care.” Patrick Stewart, discussing his baldness (via tatrtotz)

(via phweeb)

bonesys:

"If you had the choice to live in any sci-fi universe of your choice, which one would you go for?"

(via who-the-hell-is-bucky-barnes)

All of this… is unreal.

(via g-erti)